Electronic Resources: Paleography and Codicology

Digitized Manuscripts

Gateways / Catalogues 

Catalogue of Digitized Medieval Manuscripts
The Catalogue of Digitized Medieval Manuscripts seeks to provide a technological solution to a simple and rather delightful "problem": the breathtaking increase in the number of medieval manuscripts available on the web in their entirety, but in a bewildering range of venues and formats. Digitizing medieval manuscripts and releasing the images on the web has a long history, but the number of digitized manuscripts rises swiftly as the cost of high-quality digital images decreases, and the expertise needed to create easily navigable web sites becomes more common. […] The Catalogue of Digitized Medieval Manuscripts offers a simple and straightforward means to discover medieval manuscripts available on the web. Very much a work in progress, the database will initially provide links to hundreds of manuscripts, which we expect quickly to grow to thousands. Basic information about the manuscripts is fully searchable, and users can also browse through the complete contents of the database. As the project develops, a richer body of information for each manuscript, and the texts in these codices, will be provided, where available. [description taken from website]

Consulting Medieval Manuscripts Online
Splendid and extremely rich gateway site to catalogues, libraries, and other sites containing digitized images. Links to libraries, but also projects (e.g. on musical manuscripts, scientific Arabic manuscripts, etc.).

Medieval Manuscripts on the Web
A rich list of links intended to offer quick access to various digitization projects on the web: clicking the project title will take you directly there. Listings are alphabetical by originating institution. Some of the links are annotated on separate pages, now also with sub-lists (in most cases, for complete manuscripts only) by type, text, and language, as well as an alphabetical list by shelfmarks. These lists were still being built as of August 2010, and will doubtless be a long time in the making. [description adapted from website]

Manuscripta Mediaevalia
The
starting point for research on manuscripts in/from German libraries (Munich, Berlin, and basically all others). The site contains searchable online-versions of all major manuscript catalogues on German libraries and now also incorporates (again via a searchable database) all digitized manuscripts from all German libraries. Massively funded by libraries and the German Research Foundation and constantly updated.

Arts Online: Manuscripts
Quite useful gateway to major libraries and collections with digitized images. Not searchable.

 

Important Online Collections

Digital Scriptorum
Image database of medieval and renaissance manuscripts that unites scattered resources from many institutions into an international tool for teaching and scholarly research. It bridges the gap between a diverse user community and the limited resources of libraries by means of sample imaging and extensive rather than intensive cataloging. 

Manuscripta Mediaevalia
The
starting point for research on manuscripts in/from German libraries (Munich, Berlin, and basically all others). The site contains searchable online-versions of all major manuscript catalogues on German libraries and now also incorporates (again via a searchable database) all digitized manuscripts from all German libraries. Massively funded by libraries and the German Research Foundation and constantly updated.

Scriptorium: Medieval and Early-Modern Manuscripts Online (Cambridge)
A digital archive of manuscript miscellanies and commonplace books from the period c. 1450-1720; the website will provide unrestricted public access to these images. Scriptorium also develops and publishs a set of online pedagogical and research resources supporting late medieval and early modern manuscript studies.  Scriptorium will be working with the manuscript collections in a number of college libraries in Cambridge, as well as the Cambridge University Library, the Brotherton Library in Leeds, and other archives, such as that of Holkham Hall in Norfolk. [description adapted from website]

 

E-Resources in Major Libraries

British Library (Latin, Greek, Arabic)

Bayerische Staatsbibliothek (Munich)
Munich Digitization Center (MDZ) handles the digitization and online publication of the cultural heritage preserved by the Bavarian State Library and by other institutions. It provides one of the largest and fastest growing digital collections in Germany, now comprising 500,411 titles available online. Access is free of charge! The digitization policy reflects the traditional special collection fields of the library: History, Classical Antiquity, Eastern Europe, Musicology. It comprises manuscripts, early prints, modern books, maps, and photographic collections, as well as journals and newspapers. Latin, Greek, German manuscripts; incunabula; early-printed books. [description adapted from website]

Swiss Libraries: e-codices (incl. St. Gall!)  
The goal of the e-codices project is to provide access to all medieval and selected early modern manuscripts held in Switzerland via a virtual library. [description taken from website]

Gallica – Bibliotheque Nationale
Gallica is the site for online resources (manuscripts, incunabula, early-printed books) from the Bibliotheque Nationale.

Bodleian Library
Starting point for e-resources "in" the Bodleian Library (including manuscript catalogues!).

Cambridge Libraries
Starting point for e-resources "in" Cambridge Libraries (including mansucript catalogues!).

 

Research Tools

Vocabulaire codicologique
Online version of Denis Muzerelle, Vocabulaire codicologique: répertoire méthodique des termes français relatifs aux manuscrits (Paris: Editions CEMI, 1985).  Defines codicological terms and provides translations of terms in 
English, Spanish, and Italian, as well as hyper-linked diagrams whenever relevant.

Cappeli online
Online version (scanned images; not searchable) of Capelli’s Dizionario delle Abbreviature.

Abbreviationes  – UCB access only
Abbreviationes™, the first database of medieval Latin abbreviations (first publicly shown in 1992, generally available since 1993), is a great tool for deciphering and transcribing medieval Latin manuscripts. It is a standard reference work and reflects the state of contemporary scholarship. All you need is a Web browser connected to the Internet. That’s it. There is nothing to install, no settings to configure, and no usernames or passwords to remember. [description adapted from website]

In Principio - UCB access only
Wonderful tool: includes approximately one million incipits!

Scriptorium: Medieval and Early-Modern Manuscripts Online (Cambridge)
A digital archive of manuscript miscellanies and commonplace books from the period c. 1450-1720; the website will provide unrestricted public access to these images. Scriptorium also develops and publishs a set of online pedagogical and research resources supporting late medieval and early modern manuscript studies.  Scriptorium will be working with the manuscript collections in a number of college libraries in Cambridge, as well as the Cambridge University Library, the Brotherton Library in Leeds, and other archives, such as that of Holkham Hall in Norfolk. [description adapted from website]